EXPERIENCE NIRVANA: A FRAGRANCE BY ELIZABETH AND JAMES

Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen release their first adult fragrance, Nirvana under Elizabeth and James 

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Presumably, Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen are early risers. Millionaires at age nine and sitting atop a significant empire of three corporations at 27, the innate work ethic breathed into the twins before they could speak was only a fragment of the formula responsible for their improbable success. Drudgery aside, the calculated move to take over Dualstar Entertainment Group at 18, after a lifetime of being directed, sealed their fate as moguls. It took a bit of disciplinary transcendence fused with acute intuition to perform the vanishing act behind their luxury companies. These days, their chairmanship at the CFDA is finally garnering more attention than their supposed BMI.

So how do you navigate the enigmatic ministry of fashion without being born into its sanctity? Carefully. It takes a deliberately potent breed of gritty eloquence to become a legitimate player amongst the sartorial elite. And if you are the Olsens, it takes cautious exorcism of your begrudged celebrity to redirect the media’s attention from who you are to what you do. As the Hillary Duffs and fashion school DIY-ers have learned the hard way, sitting at the table amongst billionaire-owned, luxury apparel corporations is a chronicle of mêlées at best. The sisters’ most notable accomplishments have occurred independent of the haphazard entertainment industry. Now behind closed doors, Mary-Kate and Ashley have gently prospered on their own terms.

READ THE FULL FEATURE ON NIRVANA HERE

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RESISTING THE TREND: KAYNE GRIFFIN CORCORAN IS MARCHING TO THEIR OWN BEAT

At just 29 years old, Maggie Kayne has been staking claim to LA’s illustriously enigmatic art world. Between her freshly minted 15,000 square foot gallery space with partners James Corcoran and Bill Griffin, her celebrated inaugural show with long-time pal and all-around man about town James Turrell, and her recent exhibition with demi-god David Lynch, it’s safe to say that Maggie is staying ahead of the curve. And all while barely pushing the greater part of her adult years.

Kayne Griffin Corcoran, Maggie’s exceptionally designed space on south La Brea is a soothing retreat, complete with Turrellian (patent pending) light elements, a retractable Skyspace, and various outdoor elements also designed by Turrell.  A veiled treasure among the encroaching auto shops and fast food eyesores on the same stretch, the gallery might be easy to miss to the untrained eye.

I enjoy being slightly off the beaten path. I like to be a little bit removed . . . but still conveniently located.

“I enjoy being slightly off the beaten path,” Maggie says. “I like to be a little bit removed . . . but still conveniently located.”

She approaches art with the same iconoclastic, trailblazing streak, steering clear of the relatively established cobblestoned road of traditional art dealing in favor of a freshly paved one.

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READ THE FULL FEATURE ON KAYNE GRIFFIN CORCORAN AT HER E-ISSUE HERE.

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THE DOUBLE-EDGED COCKTAIL: GOLDIE’S BATTERY PARK REIMAGINES A BAR STAPLE

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Some like bitter, others like sweet. Even in this day and age of trend complexity in cocktails, that dichotomy has guided bar managers and mixologists in the crafting of their menus to appeal to the palates of both the newb alcoholic consumptionist and the experienced drinker whose tastebuds no longer tolerate the juice-like composition of many a college cocktail. Even the most elitist of bars have a menu that varies in range from “this is how I imagine bug juice and gasoline tastes, and I like it” to “ah, saccharine nectar of the gods—I hope this still has some alcohol in it.

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So how to craft a cocktail that could please both the supposed male and female palates, whatever they may be?  Tradition dictates that the male favors the cocktail that lets the flavor of the liquor come through, while the female leans toward the cocktails whose sodas, juices, and syrups mask what can be perceived as an unsavory taste of alcohol. Though this gender-based dichotomy is arguably outdated, the fact still stands that crafting a cocktail that appeals to a broad spectrum of palates is no easy task.

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READ THE FULL FEATURE ON BATTERY PARK ON OUR E-ISSUE HERE

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LABOR OF LOVE: BESTIA’S CHEFS ORI MENASHE AND GENEVIEVE GERGIS DISH ON AFFAIRS OF THE KITCHEN AND DEVOTION

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Chef Ori Menashe and Chef Genevieve Gergis are more than just the talented visionaries behind Bestia, one of LA’s premier and innovative Italian restaurants located in the Arts District. They are also the warm and passionate husband-and-wife team with plans to expand both their restaurant and family in the coming months. The pair discuss their inspirations, the LA food scene, and, of course, the challenges and rewards of mixing love and cooking.

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LAC: Dishes like “sea urchin with mint and nectarine” or “cacao pasta with oxtail and currents,” and in the dessert arena, “tarts laced with butterscotch and coconut,” scream innovation and creativity. Not to mention all of your in-house cured meats. What inspires your menu?

Chef Ori: I create depending on the season. So when nectarines were in season, I created that dish to center around the nectarine. Maybe the sea urchin seems like the main ingredient there, but it was more about the nectarine. For example, I taste the nectarine and then I try to balance the nectarine with other flavors. Very seasonal and we try to think outside of the box—not to be too focused on a traditional Italian menu. Though there are a lot of traditional elements, we try to put a spin on it based on what is here in California or what produce we have available. For us, it’s all about fresh ingredients, local ingredients, and the highest quality possible. The flavor profile is just things that make sense in my head. So, you have the nectarine that is sweet and you have the brininess of the sea urchin, and add the element of mint to balance the two.   Nectarines work really well with mint, maybe not with sea urchin, but with mint bringing the two together, it makes sense. Then, we put some lardo on top, which acts as the binder. You need that balance to create a dish. Whatever it is– sweetness, acidity, herbs—for me it is all about balance. The right bite of everything on the plate.

Chef Genevieve: Mine is a little bit different. I am very focused on the season too, but I would say my inspiration comes from childhood. A lot of my desserts are about experiences in my childhood. So the butterscotch and coconut actually comes from a Samoa cookie. When I was little, my absolute favorite Girl Scout cookie was a Samoa. I tried to recreate it, but I felt that the chocolate overpowered it. I ended up just using butterscotch and coconut and pairing it with a fresh coconut sorbet to give it a freshness. You get the dry coconut and then the summery coconut that goes with it. When I create a dish, I will often use an inspiration from something I’ve had and end up turning it into something that no one recognizes. Everything comes from things I love or have had along the way—a cookie, a candy, anything.

 

READ THE FULL FEATURE ON BESTIA HERE.

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text NOAH BRISCOE
photo KATHRYNA HANCOCK

ABOUT A GIRL: SINGER-SONGWRITER YUNA TEACHES US A THING OR TWO ON SIMPLICITY

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Malaysian born songstress Yuna has been charming her way across America for the past two years, wooing crowds with buoyant tones and a seemingly effortless confluence of warm, playful melodies and a neighborly otherness that renders her debonair mien at once both new and familiar.

Since the release of last year’s “Live Your Life,” a breezy collaboration with the ageless Pharrell Williams, Yuna has been popping up at different ends of the musical spectrum. She was first given the emo-step remix rinse by Adventure Club before going viral with a cover of Frank Ocean’s “Thinkin’ Bout You“. She’s done it all while rocking the most badass headscarf since Erykah Badu.

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The colorful patterns sheathing her hair could be considered one of the most positive expressions of modern Islamic identity in American music to date, but she refers to her hijab-adjacent stylings in an understated way. Most people don’t even know that it is an expression of faith and not fashion. It all comes down to modesty, an ideal that Yuna holds close. “Modesty is a beautiful thing,” she says, “It doesn’t always have to be ‘skin, skin, skin.’  It’s difficult for people who don’t understand. They look at me and they see oppression, but I don’t feel oppressed. It’s my choice.”

In a way, her reservations act as a buffer for the less savory elements of commercial music. She explains, “There’re a lot of things out there that are fabricated. A lot of people write about, like, fame, gold chains and stuff. That’s great, but I realize that I have responsibilities as a songwriter. People here want something that’s real. When I put my music out there, I don’t have anything else to offer, no skin. It’s just music.”

READ THE FULL FEATURE ON YUNA HERE.

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TEXT JEMAYEL KHAWAJA
PHOTO YOSHINO @ 7 ARTIST MANAGEMENT