RECAP: HERCULES & LOVE AFFAIR AT REDBULL SOUND SELECT

When one associates RedBull and music, it’s usually with bands that are indie, edgy, and active. The latest edition of the RedBull Sound Select series really flipped the switch. At a packed house in West Hollywood, east side kids poured in to the Troubadour to get weird and dance all night to house, nu-disco, and R&B.

After salutations, the vibe instantly turned sensual and smooth as Rare Times opened the bill. The LA-based outfit has earned buzz for fusing silky, alt-R&B vocals over moody synthesized tracks. They played favorites like “Sirens Calling” and “Watched Over”- the latter being their most convincing and energetic performance. With much anticipation of their upcoming EP, hopefully the young duo’s live set can further evolve.

The series progressed with the spacey synth-pop sounds of Oh Boy Les Mecs, the group consisting of Mec and leading lady, Tracy Marcellino. She took the stage with messy long hair and a Bjork-esque fluffy, ruffled jacket. Main man, Hanford Pittman, appeared burly and ready to slay – like a Southern hardcore rocker. As if from some dark delirium, the pair creepily and confidently banged out hits like “Unrest” on synths atop of LED tables that lit up in various shades, which added greater stimulation to their live show.

Headlining the night was house/disco collective Hercules & Love Affair, their first performance in LA in 3 years. Fronted by dance music champion, Andy Butler. The NYC based project features a fluctuating cast of music vets who are able to hit high notes and revel across stage like schoolchildren. They performed timeless tracks such as “My House” and “Do You Feel The Same,” steering attendees into a dance frenzy. More insanity ensued when the ensemble invited the audience to party with them on stage.

The highlight of the night was pride of the East Side / Rhonda royalty: DJ Goddollars. He seamlessly curated cohesion between the event’s 3 different acts, while still keeping the party going for attendees.

The next edition of RedBull Sound Select is scheduled for November 21st, for only $3 bucks! RSVP to get your name, first come first served, on the list here.

SONG OF THE DAY: CHOICEVAUGHAN – “LOVES BABYFACE”

Music nowadays is on some kind of global takeover — what seemed to start in Canada with the likes of Drake and now Ryan Hemsworth and Kaytranada, has trickled to the lands down under in Australia and New Zealand. I mean, let’s face it, some of the folks that we have on constant rotation right now are straight out of the southwestern hemisphere: Flume, Ta-Ku, Hiatus Kaiyote, Lorde, and The Wyld, are all respectively from from either Australia or New Zealand. And, well, we’re about to add another one to our list.

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Enter ChoiceVaughan. We caught wind of the Lower Hutt valley native through London DJ/radio host Complexion‘s weekly “Future Beats Show,” and it was love at first bass drop. The featured cut, titled, “Loves BabyFace,” is one off his recently released EP, “The Reveremixes,” a seven track project of favored 90’s R&B reworks with amplified boom-bap production re-sexified for your body-rolling pleasure. We don’t know about you guys, but we think it’s going to be a minute before the whole 90s-R&B-edit trend dies, but you know what.. we’re not complaining. Check out the track below, and check out ChoiceVaughan’s soundcloud here.

INTERVIEW: KAYTRANADA

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Lucky us. Kevin Celestin, aka Montreal beatsmith, Kaytranada, is in LA for two shows this week for his No Peer Pressure tour featuring Groundislava and Jerome LOL (though his LA shows will open with Morri$ and Colta), and we managed to sneak in some couch-time conversations. We spoke a bit about his up-coming tour in the US, genre-labeing, Drizzy Drake and bodybuilding babes. 

LA CANVAS: I actually didn’t know English wasn’t your first language. That’s what Will (Kaytra’s manager) told me just now.

Well yeah, I’m from Montreal so I speak French. But we throw some English words in there, kind of like slang I guess.

LAC: So you just came off of an Australia tour with Ryan Hemsworth, and this is your first American solo tour. Is there a difference between the Australian crowd and the US crowd?

Yeah, the Australians go hard, they’re a lot rowdier, but I think that’s because most of them seem younger. I haven’t been to all of America yet but when I was in New York, I could tell that they weren’t really feeling it; I mean, they were dancing and all, but they weren’t going hard. I know LA goes hard though, LA gets down.

LAC: How was the tour kick-off in San Jose?

San Jose was cool, there was this girl dancing all over the stage, she was twerking and all that. It was crazy, I wasn’t expecting all that (laughs)

LAC: So you released the “Hilarity Duff” track, the second song off of the EP, and Earmilk and Hypetrak are all over it – they’re already anticipating the EP to be huge. How does that feel?

I mean, to hear or read something like that, it’s crazy, if not reassuring. The track was even featured on HotNewHipHop and they put the word “hot” in front it; and I was just surprised the track was even featured on a hip-hop blog. Something like that though, it definitely tells you that you’ve made it though, hearing that type of shit.

LAC: The “At All” video, though – that was nuts with the buff ass girls. Who came up with that idea?

The one who came up with video idea was my friend, Martin Pariseau. He called me about the idea of the bodybuilding women and me hanging with them and doing weird shit. I wasn’t really down with it at first, but I don’t know, when we were at the shoot, I knew it was going to be a big thing so I did it.

LAC: Was being carried weird?

Not really. I mean, we’ve all been carried when we were kids so, it ain’t that weird. But I couldn’t stop laughing.

LAC: Yeah, I bet. Just the imagery of it all was like, “What the hell?” I was diggin’ your jersey.

Yeah, that was the point of it all; and yeah, I was diggin’ it too, I wished the jersey was mine.

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LAC: When you listen to your tracks, you can hear the hip-hop, R&B, soul and disco influences in your background. Given that, is it weird to be labeled as an electronic artist/producer?

I mean it is weird because I don’t like to label myself as an electronic DJ because I’m always pulling from other genres, cause that’s what I listen to. I listen to hip-hop, R&B, a lot of old disco and that transfers to my music. Even the… I don’t want to call it trap, but I use a lot of that downbeat hip-hop bass, and I just don’t think the electronic label fits it. Nowadays it’s like, how can you tell my music is hip-hop? By the BPM? It’s so hard to slap any one genre onto music because we’re pulling influences from all these other different places, you can’t just place it into one bubble.

LAC: What have been the major differences since signing with Huh, What & Where (HW&W) Recordings? Has being a part of that helped you creatively?

It’s been cool. I mean, since I signed with them, I still stayed in my own lane, just doing my own thing. The label used to be just about instrumental beats, and even then I still want creative control over my music. But they’re the homies and they’ve helped get my name and music out, and then I get to do cool shit with them, like Boiler Room. So overall, it’s been cool, it’s been great.

LAC: I was browsing through your SoundCloud and saw some tracks under “The Celestics.” Is that like, a side project, or something you started prior to being a solo producer?

Yeah, it’s a hip-hop group I was working with, it was actually the first project I was doing, and it just never popped off cause we weren’t really working at it. Instead of recording or working on tracks, we’d just fuck around or be lazy or whatever. It was me and my brother, Louie P, he was the rapper and I was the producer – I was still Kaytradamus then and just making hip-hop beats. I didn’t want to associate Kaytranada (the solo producer) with the group, I just wanted to be the producer and have the music solely stand as The Celestics. But yeah, it was something that we were trying to do, and I want to keep working at it; we already have a few tracks out, “Charles Barkley,” and “Kill,” that are getting some recognition, so it’s something that I want to keep pursuing.

LAC: Was it hard to keep working on The Celestics while you yourself were getting recognition for your solo tracks?

I mean, yeah that was definitely part of it. Like when I started releasing tracks on my SoundCloud and people were feeling it, and I was getting a shit-ton of likes on it, and recognition from blogs, it was like I said before, it’s like you see you’ve made it or that you were doing something right. When “If” popped off, that was when things really started to escalate and it was like, I’m being more successful at this than with The Celestics so…

LAC: I mean, at that point,  it seems like you had no choice but to run with it.

Yeah, exactly.

LAC: I was actually going to ask you about the name change. Did changing the name from “Kaytradamus” to “Kaytranada” happen because of your success as a producer and a drift from The Celestics?

It was kind of part of it, but at the time, it was when I was still doing more “trap” beats and that also was when Flosstradmus was coming out too, and I didn’t want it to look like I was biting off them or anything like that. I was already hearing shit from my friends on Twitter like, “Who the fuck you think you are?” or “Why you biting off Floss?” and I just didn’t want to deal with that shit. I actually prefer to just be called “Kaytra,” but it’s too late to change it now at this point (laughs). But yeah, Kaytranada is more of a random name.

LAC: Going off your Twitter point, I saw a while back when (Drake’s) “Nothing Was the Same” first came out that you Tweeted that he could’ve done better musically. What would you have done with the album? Does that mean we’re going to get some Drake edits in the near future?

I mean.. I don’t know. I’m not disrespecting Drake in any way, but I just think that musically he really could have done better. Like, his team did  hit me up for some beats but they wound up not using them (for NWTS). If they did though, I can guarantee that that would’ve been a classic ass album. I mean, he could hit up any underground artist – whether that be me, Sango, Star Slinger, whoever – and that would be classic.

LAC: Who would you want to collabo with in the future? Near-future or even big dream-status? I’m sure you have a long list.

Oh man… yeah, I have a fat list. I mean, I’ve done a bunch of Erykah Badu edits, a ton of Janet edits, so I’d love to work with them or other people that have remixed their tracks too. The tracks I want to do, I don’t really want or need any big time names on them, I’d just want to work with people that have that sound that I like.. like, I absolutely have to have a neo-soul singer on my tracks, maybe a rapper… but definitely a neo-soul singer.

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LAC: Who are you listening to right now?

I listen to so much shit, man… really though I listen to a lot of old school disco and funk, mostly underground stuff. In a general sense I listen to a lot of underground music, especially hip-hop, disco, funk. A lot of 90’s R&B too, obviously. I love Janet.

LAC: So what should we expect for 2014?

Oh, I don’t know… I mean, I will say this: I’m definitely working towards releasing an album. It might be released in 2014, it might be released 2015, I don’t know, depends on if I’m feeling it or if I get into the right creative groove within the next year. But, we got some big things planned out, some collabos and projects that I don’t think people are ready for; I really don’t think y’all are ready for it.

 

Catch Kaytranada at Los Globos this Thursday, cop your tickets while you still can right here.

SONG OF THE DAY: JUSTIN BIEBER – “ALL THAT MATTERS” (JEFTUZ REMIX)

The day we feared has come…. we’ve contracted Bieber-fever. Since the YouTube star was first discovered in 2008, he’s gone through a series of, well…. we’ll call them “stages” for this moment, where the tweenage heartthrob has undergone some Chris Brown-like transformations. From the shirtless performances to the tattoos to the reckless behavior, this kid is no longer the bowl-hair cut donning prepubescent that we would never reveal to being enthralled by. But you know what they say: when you have a problem, the first step is admitting it.

Okay so the real guise that drew us in was that the song is a Jeftuz remix. A producer out of Netherlands, Jeftuz first got our attention with releases like “S. Ama,” and “Girl,” — heavy R&B tracks laden with deep drums and snares overlain with filtered samples and luscious melodies. We love you Justin, but it’s guys like Jeftuz that’s bringing that sexy-R&B back.

True to form, Jeftuz works his producer magic with Bieber’s, “All That Matters,” but what puzzles us is that to our ears it sounds like he barely made any adjustments to the song, aside from adding a high hat element and filtering down the production as a whole. Does this mean that the Beebs is going to come full circle on his Chris Brown-evolution and start doing sultry R&B?? Check out the original below for yourself and you tell us what you think.

If this is what happens every time a teen heart throb goes through puberty, we ain’t mad at it. We might have to check into Beiber-Fever-Anonymous.

MIX OF THE DAY: TRIPPY TURTLE’S DIPLO & FRIENDS MIX ON BBC RADIO 1

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Saturday mornings was the happiest when I was a kid — no school, a bowl of cereal and Saturday morning cartoons, and I was set. Nowadays Saturday mornings are more or less the same — no work, a bowl of leftover drunchies (usually a half-eaten burrito), and BBC Radio 1’s weekly Diplo & Friends, and you can call me a happy camper, if not a hungover one.


A few weekends back, the Diplo & Friends guest DJ was a reptilian bohemian that goes by the name of Trippy Turtle… and really, that’s all we can tell you. Thanks to the Internet, DJs, artists and producers are popping up like daisies, sometimes with little to no information on who exactly these folks are — and Trippy is one of them.

Based off of his Facebook posts and Tweets, Trippy might reside somewhere in Europe (he recently did a show in Norway with Sinjin Hawke and has a show at the end of November in Paris) and rubs virtual elbows with Cashmere Cat. The two frequently feature each other on their respective mixes, including Cashmere Cat’s own turn on Diplo & Friends and his recent hangout with Gilles Peterson. Many thought Trippy was a Cashmere Cat alias, but he squashed that accusation months ago.

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Trippy’s BBC1 mix is all machine whirrs, withered down syrupy R&B samples and edits, thunderous bass and stutters — a mix of sex trap and Jersey club , if you will. Really, this mix has it all. It’ll have you singing along, while simultaneously doing body rolls and that infamous trap dance that looks like you’re doing some really weird pull-ups all at once. That’s how good it is, but I shouldn’t have to tell you twice. Hit that play button.

Check out more of Trippy Turtle’s tracks and edits at his soundcloud.

DELICIOUS VINYL: SAME MISSION, NEW METHODS

Move over Snoop, we know you’re a D-O-Double-G, but the triple Double-OG’s aren’t going anywhere just yet.

LA-based label Delicious Vinyl originated in the late 1980s, by signing two of LA’s finest pre-gangsta rap hip-hop acts to their roster, legend Tone Loc and Young MC. Throughout the years, DV was known for signing acts that have become pioneers and forerunners for their respective genres — acts like The Pharcyde, The Born Jamericans, The Brand New Heavies and the Masters of Reality, just to name a few.

 THE BIZARRE RIDE AT DV SHOP
Bizarre Ride at the DV Shop | Photo Cred: Asato Lida

But fast forward a couple years and the label’s evolution transcended into territories that were just on the cusp of making it big – DV’s Rick Ross (not to be confused by one Miami security guard) was one of the first in LA to delve into the world of electronic music before it made its mainstream explosion in the city of angels.

Founder Mike Ross and all his cohorts were capable of recognizing what was up and coming with music, acting with some kind of musical wizardy for knowing what people were going to eat up next as far as genres go.

True to form, DV is nowhere near falling off the grid. In recent years, the label/record store began to host “DVTV Sessions,” weekly events where they would bring in a guest DJ to spin at the shop, while streaming it live on ustream.

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Aaron LaCrate at DVTV Session #50 | Photo Cred: Asato Lida

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Teebs at DVTV Session #54 | Photo Cred: Asato Lida

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Alexander Spit at DVTV Sessions #44 | Photo Cred: Asato Lida

The idea here is not only to keep up with the hottest artists in the game right now, but to also take over in a new role as a pseudo-online radio station – highlighting top DJs and artists to music lovers not only in LA, but all over the blog-o-sphere while establishing an online presence.

55 Sessions-deep and a soon to be released season 1 wrap-up on the way, the DVTV Sessions have been highly successful in that its brought in a whole range of acts – from Beat Junkies godfather Rhettmatic to new kids on the block like Soulection and Falcons.

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Blasion Maven at DV Shop | Photo Cred: Asato Lida

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Rhettmatic at DVTV Sessions #48 | Photo Cred: Asato Lida

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Star Slinger at DVTV Sessions #55 | Photo Cred: Asato Lida

The next scheduled DVTV Sessions is October 11 with TeamSupreme, so set your calendars folks. Until then check out a few of DV’s recap videos and all the DVTV sessions on their Ustream channel.


Delicious Vinyl TV: A Day With (G)uards | Video Cred: Asato Lida


Delicious Vinyl TV Session #54: My Hollow Drum Take Over | Video Cred: Asato Lida


Delicious Vinyl TV Session #53: Nanna B. | Video Cred: Asato Lida

LISTEN UP: MOD CREW’S YUNG SATAN

So I moved to LA for a number of reasons, but let’s keep it real, I really moved down here for two things. One: of course, I found a job. And two: LA’s music scene.

Originally recognized through Low End Theory and the likes of artists like Free the Robots, LA’s beat scene has been on a huge rise in the last few years, and I don’t know what has kids coming out with these beats, but I dig it. Is it something in the water? Hell, maybe it’s the traffic or the pollution, something!

The M|O|D crew has slowly but surely breaking ground with their trap tapes and Peng compilations, but individual artists like Arnold, C.Z. and Lil Texas are starting to speed up the breakthrough process. Add in a kid like Yung Satan, and it’s only a matter of time until these guys are headlining major show festivals.

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Yung Satan | Photo Cred: Jason “OHDAGYO” Fenmore

Disregarding any “future trap” label that might come up on your Google search of the kid, Yung Satan’s sound in a nutshell in heavy bass undertones with an overlay of 80s and 90s R&B/soul samples, like in his most release, “Tell Me.”

Chopping and screwing the samples are Yung Satan’s forte for dissecting the samples to his liking but the R&B influences are there and compliment the true-to-M|O|D nature of “club” and “trap” music. What Yung Satan does is to transform that type of “trap” and “club” music into something outside of it.

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Yung Satan | Photo Cred: Jason “OHDAGYO” Fenmore

It’s a one-two punch combo that on paper lay on opposite ends of the sound spectrum but Yung Satan’s chord progressions and high hats pull it all full circle and leave you wanting something beyond a five-track EP and a sprinkling of remixes and guest mixes.

Last night the kid and the rest of the M|o|D crew and Team Supreme threw a party at The Echo, with sets from Yung Satan himself, M|O|D brethren Lil Texas and Arnold, Colta and Djemba Djemba from Team Supreme, and many more. The good thing about being based in LA is hey, you never know when his next gig will pop up in the greater LA county area, so keep an eye on his Facebook and Twitter and in the mean time, tune in to his guest mix featured on Beatflakes.

RECAP: BRITISH DUO ALUNAGEORGE AT THE EL REY

What a belle époque to be a male-female music duo: Beach House, Sleigh Bells, Purity Ring, we really could keep going. One tag-team we’ve had our ears out for is British duo, AlunaGeorge. Producer George Reid and songstress Aluna Francis have been on the scene, serving infectious originals and brilliant features on tracks of other rising acts, like UK electronic duo, Disclosure. The pair has been building buzz with their sub-genre-bending take on pop music, Aluna’s distinctive vocals, and their protagonist verses. Following the summer release of their full length “Body Music,” the Brits hit the road on their first North American tour, and recently made their LA debut to a pumped-up packed house at the El Rey.

Aluna strutted on stage robed as a futuristic boxing goddess with George boyishly bopping on synthesizer, and backed by live drums and bass. As the digital and organic sounds harmoniously flooded the venue, the audience feverishly danced and sang along to favorites like “Attracting Flies,” White Noise,” and “This Is How We Do It.” Their cover of Montel Jordan’s timeless jam was a hit! Aluna’s bright vocals called and the crowd responded in deep refrains of the song’s memorable chorus. The show capped off with another crowd pleaser, “Your Drums, Your Love,” but left with no encore leaving attendees served and eager for more, as AlunaGeorge stepped off waving, blowing kisses and thanking fans.

So, what’s next for the pair? These two are young, talented, and are certainly onto something. Let’s hope the future proves that they’re ideal music mates, unlike some other past boy-girl duos… Ike & Tina? White Stripes? Sonic Youth… too soon?

INTERVIEW: FALCONS

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In the last year electronic music producer Michael Graham, otherwise known as Falconshas consistently been releasing a steady flow of “genreless” bootlegs and singles, which have rapidly given the young LA producer some major online popularity and support from the likes of Diplo, Ryan Hemsworth, RL Grime and Djemba Djemba. Although he uses some elements of trendy internet genres, to simply categorize him as just another SoundCloud-famous music maker would be unfair. Falcons is a versatile producer with a strong sense of structure. He manages to seamlessly blend various subcategories of bass music within a single song, creating explosive club-ready tracks packed with a widely dynamic range of sounds and styles. The up-and-comer has already performed at notable venues and events such as Boiler Room, Low End Theory and Red Bull Music Academy’s This City Belongs to Me.

We managed to get Falcons to take a break from Ableton and answer a few questions for us.

LAC: How old are you and where did you go grow up?

FALCONS: 26. Grew up in the south—my mom’s in Texas, dad’s in Oklahoma. Also lived in Vancouver, Canada for five years. So pretty much a North American transplant.

LAC: What brought you to LA?

FALCONS: An enormous gust of wind.

LAC: What led you into producing?

FALCONS: I was a dancer (house and b-boying) for 12 years, so music was always something I felt passionately about, but I didn’t really take production seriously until I got injured and needed a musical outlet. I also was super excited by all the cool, new genreless music popping up around the internet, but felt like something was missing. 😉

LAC: Did moving around influence your sound?

FALCONS: That’s a great question. I think it did inevitably from experiences and inspiration, but the root of my sound is still very Southern, very sticky.

LAC: Who are your early influences?

FALCONS: Timbaland, Pete Rock, Aphex Twin, Squarepusher, Organized Noize, Mannie Fresh and DJ Screw.

LAC: What are you listening to at the moment?

FALCONS: Basically just THE 2k14 BASS ALL-STAR STARTING LINEUP lol; Sango, Kaytranada, Dom$olo, Cabo Blanco, Arnold, Lil Texas, CZ, Yung Satan, DJ Hoodboi, Djemba Djemba, Colta, TwoFresh, Penthouse Penthouse and Carmack.

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LAC: If you could work with anyone, who would it be?

FALCONS: I think the obvious answer would be Missy Elliot and/or TImbaland . . . but really, I want to just sit in with people like Mannie Fresh and see the magic happen.

LAC: On any given day, where can we find you?

FALCONS: On the stoop in front of my place in Echo Park, drinking an iced coffee from the Thai donut shop by the crib (shoutout Angeleno’s Donuts, #turnup). Then back into my music cave.

LAC: So are you staying in LA?

FALCONS: I don’t plan my moves usually, but I can say that for now LA is working great for me, and as more of the homies move here, it’s just seeming better and better every day.

LAC: What can we expect soon from you?

FALCONS: EP of original tracks with HuhWhat&Where records, a steady flow of bootlegs as always, and lots of fun mixes. I’m doing one for SSENSE fashion site in the next few days, then Vice’s music site, Noisey.

LAC: Where are you spinning next?

FALCONS: Toronto, Austin, Vancouver and New York in the next little bit . . . never been to the east coast so I am very exciiiited. In LA, I just got a residency spot every Sunday for a new daytime party called Daylight at ATX 3245 Casitas Ave. It’s somewhere in between the party vibes of the Do-Over and the open mindedness of Low End Theory. It’s sort of a Low End spin-off that Nocando and some of our homies started. Hosted by DumbFounded. Definitely the new spot for Sundays.

 

 

Q&A: KASTLE

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We’ve long been swooning over Kastle, a producer whose love for philosophy and science translates into atmospheric beats with the soulfulness of R&B and the dancefloor rhythms of house and garage.  We speak to Kastle below about his influences, his favorite R&B records, and what the future holds for this talented musician.

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How does your experience as a sound engineer influence your music production?

Going to college for engineering definitely helped me think more about EQ’ing, dynamic range, frequency balance, and mastering. Knowing the frequencies of all your sounds and where they sit in the mix is essential.

R&B seems to have quite an influence on your music. What are your top 3 favorite R&B records?

That’s a tough question… but off the top of my head: Aaliyah’s self-titled album, Lauryn Hill’s Miseduction of Lauryn Hill and Sade’s Soldier Of Love.

Some people say R&B is dead. How do you feel about this? 

I think it’s just been in a transitional period the last couple of years. I think a lot of the traditional commercial R&B artists started going more pop/dance, which really made room for the indie artists like The Weeknd, Frank Ocean, etc. Now you have artists like Inc., Johnny Rain, JMSN, Xavier, How To Dress Well, etc. all doing it their own way and to me its very exciting. Feels more real.

What are some records or influences that might surprise your fans?

I’m influenced by a lot of things and I’ve made it no secret that I enjoy studying philosophy and science which has been the biggest inspiration to me. I’ve also recently started running at gyms and I’ve found it puts me in a zone that just opens up a lot of creative space in my head.

Tell us a little more about your collaborations on your recent albums. How did they come about? Is there anyone you’re just itching to collaborate with? 

All the collaborations happened very naturally. The first couple collabs were the tracks with JMSN and Austin Paul. JMSN and I worked on those two shortly after I had finished the remix for his track “Alone”. Austin just hit me up randomly on Soundcloud one day and we clicked. Same with Ayah Marar, she contacted me on Twitter and we instantly connected well. All of the collaborations were done via the internet.

Your music is often described among some of my friends as “babymaking” music. How does it feel to know that your music might be accompanying some very, uh, “intimate” moments?

It can be a little awkward, especially when I have been told in person at a show. Or people will leave Facebook comments about details. I guess I appreciate their honesty? Haha.

You are one of the most engaged musicians I’ve seen on social media, taking time to interact with fans, bloggers and followers. Why is this important to you, and has it influenced your music at all?

I try my best to keep involved and the airport downtime definitely helps with that a lot.  Honestly I don’t really think about it that much. If I see something and can respond… I just do. I know I miss a lot though and sometimes I do need a break from all that. But I think its great that we are all connected. I’m not trying to separate myself. Open, honest communication is good.

Where do you see yourself in the next five years? Will you stay in San Francisco?

Always such a hard question. But I will most definitely still be writing music. I love San Francisco. I think the only city that could possibly take me away from there in the next five years would be LA.

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See Kastle perform live tomorrow night at the Low End Theory. Cover is $10. More info here

Photo Credit: thesupermaniak

SONG OF THE DAY: LVLF – “DYING TO START AGAIN”

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One sonic rebirth after another. And here’s to hoping third time’s the charm.

Ally Young and Lee Newell originally began booking gigs as an emo-rock band in the UK before signing to Geffen Records as Viva Brother, their indie incarnate who broke up after a short-lived period of 9 months. If the two missed the formula for emo or indie, the two have now made a comeback as the Brooklyn-based R&B-electro-pop duo LVLF (Lovelife), and it seems that they’ve finally discovered a talent for producing infectious dance tunes paired with compressed synths, catchy melodies and downtempo beats. Their recent EP’s “The Fourth Floor” and “El Regresso” (available for download on their website) reflect the duo’s successful experimentation with radiant vocals laced upon an ever-infectious disco soundscape. “Dying to Start Again” especially showcases the nuance many lack which make a catchy song out of what could easily have been tacky. This song will be the first single off their third EP “Stateless,” which is anticipated to arrive this summer.

SONG OF THE DAY: THEM JEANS – “BODY PARTY” FT. CIARA

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Jason Stewart, better known by his stage name Them Jeans, has become a Los Angeles namesake, spinning at venues all over town, most notably for Dim Mak Tuesdays at the Cinespace. Aside from music, Stewart is considered a renaissance man of sorts, doing everything from designing his own record covers and flyers for events, to establishing his own denim line. Although Ciara’s “Body Party” has been remixed by more producers than we can count, we’ve been grooving to Stewart’s remix all day. Clearly a multi-talented man, this remix showcases Stewart’s ability to seamlessly mishmash genres and unlikely singles into new hybrid-genres like indie house or electro R&B.

SONG OF THE DAY: JACQUES GREENE – “ON YOUR SIDE” FT. HOW TO DRESS WELL

Jacques Greene makes dance music that is undeniably soulful and contagious, but little is known about the young producer, except that he has a penchant for stirring R&B vocals and deep shuffling rhythms. Greene’s latest track, “On Your Side,” is laced with yearning falsetto vocals from bedroom-pop and experimental R&B singer, How To Dress Well. The two make for a beautifully moody combination in this title track which will feature on Greene’s forthcoming EP, available for digital release June 3, and physical release July 1 on Lucky Me Records.

FIRST LISTEN: SHLOHMO – “DON’T SAY NO” FT. HOW TO DRESS WELL

Shlohmo

 

LA native and beatmaker Henry Laufer, aka Shlohmo, has hit on so many genres—electronic, hip-hop, dream-pop—all mixed into catchy psychedelic tracks. In his latest single from his much anticipated EP Laid Out, he collaborates with experimental-pop act How To Dress Well for a slow, soulful R&B track mixed with some consuming electronic beats. This will definitely leave you wanting more, but do not fret! The EP is to be released March 4th, with a special vinyl copy available April 2nd, and from our sneak peak we can guarantee that you’ll want to make sure to grab this one.

Listen to the new single below and look out for Shlohmo live on April 6th at the Fonda Theatre.