INSTANT GRATIFICATION: ANINE BING DELIVERS WHAT WE WANT, WHEN WE WANT IT

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In Los Angeles, fashion is quickly becoming as pervasive as the ubiquitous entertainment industry, permeating our social spheres from all angles. Consequently, most of us have gathered through either personal experience or the osmosis of workload complaints from friends and acquaintances, that the business follows a pretty rigorous production calendar. Satisfying the industry’s manufacturing, editorial, and retail needs has historically been a sequence of design-produce-show-sell-repeat. However, to citizens dwelling in a region that has mastered incremental climate change, we find ourselves wondering if resort collections are really all that applicable?

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Generally, only retail giants have the ability to replenish styles on a bi-weekly basis in lieu of the industry standard of bi-annual and quarterly seasons. Monopoly retailers like Zara #nodisrespecttozaraandtheirflawlessandafforableblazers, described by Louis Vuitton Fashion Director Daniel Piette as “possibly the most innovative and devastating retailer in the world,” have been a notable detriment to smaller brands, cutting the standard six-month production process into twelfths by manufacturing every garment in-house. As a result, “fast fashion” has been virtually impossible for independent designers to complete with.

Until Dutch model/musician/blogger-turned-designer, Anine Bing, rode into town.

READ THE FULL FEATURE ON ANINE BING HERE
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text ERIN DENNISON
photo HEATHER GILDROY

POWERFULLY DISJOINTED: STORYBOARD P BUCKLES DOWN FLUME & CHET FAKER’S “DROP THE GAME”

Despite what it’s become in recent years, we have to give it up to MTV for revolutionized music with the music video, especially when done right. It’s videos like Sydney filmmaker Lorin Askill‘s interpretation of Flume and Chet Faker‘s “Drop the Game” that seamlessly weaves the sonic components and visuals together to create a simultaneous storyboard experience.

The dancer in “Drop the Game” is Storyboard P, a Brooklyn dancer that previously interpreted Jay’Z’s entire Magna Carta Holy Grail, who essentially acts as the light among the shadowy streets that he dances upon. Let’s put it this way: if Flume’s dark, lush production is the video’s backdrop, then Storyboard P is Chet Faker’s vocals: the haunting, yet beautiful element that resonates over the track — a direct visual mirror to the balancing act in the sounds.

Flume and Chet Faker are set to release a collaboration project, The Lockjaw EP, on November 26.

VIDEO OF THE DAY: LOLA BLANC’S PRISMATIC VIDEO DEBUT, “BAD TATTOO”

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Lola Blanc, the trained ventriloquist and music writer to other pop names and genre relevant  producers, debuts her video for “Bad Tattoo” – the epitome of a catchy pop track. The bouncy verses blend perfectly with the colorful – yet a little weird – imagery. Reminiscent of Miley’s “We Can’t Stop” video, but less horrifying and more humorous. Blanc drips blue frosting out of her mouth, grinds on a tiger, takes comfort in a small box, sings into bananas and blue ice cream cones, all while surrounded by pastel, doll-like, babes – one being Lime Crime’s founder, Doe Deere, FYI.

Blanc’ look is a mix of 50s housewife and 90s club kid. Donning platform sneakers, neon colors, Betty Paige bangs, and rocking Jeremy Scott, Blanc’s style is eye-catching with a voice to follow. It is no wonder the pop queens seek her expertise – but they better watch out, they may just get de-throned.